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    Arthroscopic Knee Surgery / ACL Reconstruction

    In the event of a torn ACL, non-surgical treatment will never fully heal damage, but is sometimes suggested for elderly or low-activity individuals. Ligament tears cannot be reattached, but rather must be completely reconstructed using a tissue graft which provides a platform for new ligament growth. Damage to the ACL is typically diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. Read More

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    Total Knee Replacement

    Surgical procedure to replace or reconstruct a knee joint requires anesthesia and a fairly large incision. While modern technology continually aims to make the procedure as minimally invasive as possible, a 5 to 12 inch incision in the front of the knee is typically required. Read More

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    Arthroscopic Shoulder Labral Repair

    In the event of a torn labrum, many patients respond favorably to non-surgical treatment, such as physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, cortisone injections, and simple rest. If pain and irritation persists, however, arthroscopic surgery to repair the labrum is the most common recommendation. Read More

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    Arthroscopic Shoulder Rotator Cuff Repair

    Surgery to repair a torn or damaged rotator cuff is primarily conducted arthroscopically. Arthroscopic surgery is a minimally invasive procedure in which a thin tube is used to examine the inside of a joint by inserting a high-definition, fiber optic camera through small incisions. Read More

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    Total Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Arthritis is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain that requires surgical repair. Osteoarthritis is age-related, primarily affecting individuals 50 years of age or older. Protective, mobilizing cartilage wears away over time, causing bones to painfully rub against each other. Read More

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    Arthroscopic Biceps Tendon Repairs

    Much like all shoulder and arm injuries, damage to biceps tendons can occur through significant trauma involving falls and heavy lifting, or overuse. Overuse is commonly reached through repetitive arm movements required in several blue-collar occupations and sports participation. Read More

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    Total Hip Replacement

    The overall goal of total hip replacement is to remove the portions of damaged bone and cartilage and replace them with higher functioning, prosthetic components. The femur’s doorknob-like head is removed and replaced by a metal ball. This metal ball is attached to a long stem inserted into the femur. Read More

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    Carpal Tunnel Release

    Multiple tendons, including the median nerve, allow you to flex and curl your fingers. These tendons pass through a narrow, channel-like structure in the wrist known as the Carpal Tunnel. Read More

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    Trigger Finger Release

    Trigger finger is a painful condition which causes the fingers to latch and lock in place when moved into a bent position. Read More

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    Achilles Tendon Repair

    A ruptured Achilles tendon most commonly occurs while attempting physical actions that require explosive acceleration. When the ankle is flexed outside of its typical range of motion in a quick and physical fashion, it can cause the tendon to stretch beyond its capability and tear. Read More

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    Distal Radius Fracture

    The radius is the larger of two bones that make up your forearm. The far end of the radius that extends into the wrist joint is referred to as the distal end. While distal radius fractures almost always occur within an inch of the wrist joint, breaks come in many specific shapes and sizes. One of the most common breaks, a Colles fracture, occurs when the broken end of the radius tilts upward, giving your wrist a visibly distorted appearance. Read More

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    Femur Fractures

    Your femur, also known as your thighbone, is the single longest and strongest bone in your body. The femur makes up the majority of your upper leg, extending from your hip joint to your knee joint. Because the femur is so strong, it takes a significant amount of force to break it. High-energy collisions, such as severe falls and motor vehicle crashes are the most commonly seen causes. Read More

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    Ankle (Fibula) Fractures

    The tibia and fibula make up your shin and lower leg, and rest on a small bone called the talus, which separates and cushions the shinbones from your heel. Several ligaments and other fibrous tissue surround the ends of these bones and work to hold them in place. Read More

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